Friday, November 01, 2019

1930s Russian Drawn Sound: Nikolai Voinov's 'Paper Sound'

Well, this showed up on youtube - and it's pretty impressive, so for the Russian audience, I link it thusly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7Zb4rso82M&fbclid=IwAR24fykiE6AwJ_MeVgqVkGsL2hIOvS-U_bWxjA7j_chPpPSaWXLdBXYohdU

And I affix my "colorized" version, just to play with some more functions of the editing system here:


Thursday, October 31, 2019

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Wrapping Up Halloween GIFiness

Up to 14 seconds of basic animation - another few dozen sketches and it'll be ready to render into video.  Here's the ongoing GIFiness.


And another --

And the last gif version before going into "post"

Friday, October 11, 2019

The Season Approaches

V1

V1a - corrected the "catch" in the cycle - cleared the keyframe at the end of the animated symbol layer - it was saving old data:

V2 - continuing with additional layers:

V3 - nearly 6 seconds now....the suspense is killing me!

V4 - 8 seconds, my my...may get this done by Christmas...

V5 - up to 10 seconds, getting ready for the next two basic actions

Update 6 - Adjusting colors, continuing -- this is taking FOREVER


Tuesday, October 01, 2019

Consequences of an Animation Conference - the OIAF experience



Soul Töd - Animation Outline

Music - 1917 Italian mandolin recording, 78rpm played at 45rpm
Italic text represents translation from the narrator/characters.

Man in dark green room, window blinds drawn, TV on, door closed.

Narration:
Mia animo mortis.  My soul is dead.
Ii batas al la muro. It sticks to the wall.
Mia animo pikas.  My soul stinks.
Miaj internaj demonoj malaperis. My inner demon is gone.

Television is running poorly received broadcast.

The mail slot has a note appear, it retracts.
He opens the door.
A screaming mouth is there.  Spit sprays.  Teeth threaten.  The note is on the tongue.
No response.  Man takes the note.  Closes the door.
It is dripping and illegible.


He opens the door again.  The screaming continues, uninterrupted.  He puts the note back on the tongue and closes the door.

He is drenched in spit.  He goes to the bathroom.  A giant eye is peering into the window.
He looks in the broken mirror.

Narration:
Rasulo prizorgos ĉi tiun salaton. A shave will take care of this mess.

He leaves through the back of his house.  Demons encircle all houses on his street, screaming into the front door as they embrace the building.


He goes to a barber shop. 

The pole is slowly spinning, the white stripe unraveling onto the ground, the red area oozing out.

One man is there ahead of him in the chair.  He has a marble eye.


Customer:
Mia okulo ofendas min. My eye offends me.


The barber approaches him from behind, and in a shot to mimic Un Chien d’Anadalou, looks out the window at a cloud bisecting the sun, then draws his razor over the marble eye of the customer.  The blade cracks and splits.

The customer stands.

Customer:
Via klingo estas tiel obtuza kiel via spriteco Your blade is as dull as your wit.  

He plucks out his marble eye and slams it into the forehead of the barber.  It sets off a blaze of psychedelic colors behind him.



Narration:
Mia bardisto havis religian sperton. Li komencis preĝejon. My barber had a religious experience.  He started a church.

The skies are bright and cheerful, the church is surrounded by marble eyes and broken razors.  The barber, now aglow with his marble eye in the center of his forehead, preaches a sermon.

The barber:
Mia okulo lasas aeron al mia cerbo por ke miaj oreloj kantu. My eye lets air to my brain so my ears can sing.
Kristaloj dissiris miajn pensojn kaj la koloroj estas bongustaj. Crystals shred my thoughts and the colors are delicious. 
Morta animo ne povas kanti, barba vizago kasas niajn cikatrojn. A dead soul cannot sing, a bearded face hides our inner scars.
Kuketoj felicigas min. Cookies make me happy.
Ciu laudo al kuketoj. All praise to cookies.
Ottoman!
Ottoman!

Narration:
Liaj vortoj estis potencaj. Unu post unu, la demonoj komencis foriri.  His words were powerful.  One by one, the demons started to leave.

We see the reverse of the earlier shots, with the embracing demons slowly pfft’ing into dust as he walks home.

The man gets another note in the mail slot.  He opens the door.  It is a sunny day, no screaming demon mouth.  He reads the note.  It is junk mail.

Narration:
Mi nun ne devas fari mian lavilon. I don’t have to do my laundry as often now. 
Mi pensas, ke mi kreskos barbon. I think I’ll grow a beard.
Mankas al mi demonoj. I miss my demons.

Fade to black.

Voice in the dark:
Ottoman.



Credits
Surbaze de la rakonto, "La Bloto", de Francesca Kafka
Grava financado de Koseraj Eksteruloj de Beogrado
Perceptita de Jim Middleton

The Ottawa International Animation Festival - OIAF - Notes from September, 2008

After a decade, a return to Ottawa, seeming oddly changed, or realigned, or ... something.  So this note came from a file from a 2008 visit.  The return visits will not be separated by 10 years, that's for certain...

Once a year, I am physically moved to a foreign land of ambulating masses, where the most revolutionary of gothic jaywalkers performs her disobedience with civility, and where the creamy foam head of a Guinness pint is measured in centimeters.
Aside from my home base of Battle Creek, I have spent more time in Ottawa over the past decade than practically any other city on this planet. I find myself giving directions to places along Elgin Street, knowing the hours of the Rideau Centre, and even knowing that Centre is French for Center. I have even sampled the gravied cheese curd comfort food called poutain, although it still remains under the category of “acquired taste.”
The draw has never been Parliament, although their sessions are lively and drip in delicious sarcasm, and while the museums are striking and the scenery evocative of lost forests in central European, what pulls me to the most civilized of North American capitols is the OIAF. Some of this is purely force of habit: before video and DVD, and even before KAFI, the OIAF is where you had to go to see international animation on a large screen, or absorb the latest 90-second test film from that upstart bunch at Pixar. Even once the novelty was diluted by the expanding availability of animation on video and cable, there remained the sense of community-- first of old-school animators, then of increasingly-earnest afficionados. And now of a new generation, able to create and share their work quickly and electronically, can converge and experience what the internet can only emulate–human contact.
Chris Robinson has grown into his role as master of these ceremonies, from his hesitant and seemingly hostile beginnings to that of – dare one use the word congenial? – young fogey who delights in the occasional outrage while poking at the perimeter of propriety. He certainly seems to be using his time efficiently while on his ship of state–this visit served to premiere not one, but two books on animation (a biography of the late Ryan Larkin and a collection of interviews with Canadian animators).
To this setting, this sense of community, and its inherent enthusiasm, add a series of astonishing films and programs. This OIAF was a case of delicious sensory overloads. The feature films in competition included two created in Flash– Waltz with Bashir, a blend of documentary and Apocalypse Now surrealism by Ari Folman, and the astonishing Sita Sings the Blues, presented in multiple stylistic forms by Nina Paley, who bankrupted herself to create this five year labor of love.
The short films ranged from the stark Dark Years to the utterly giddy Lollypop to the bloodfest Super Jail. Five sets of films, only moderately overpriced popcorn and soda, and generally great weather for the walk between theaters. Even the picnic, with its ritualized pumpkin carving competition, left participants unscathed and winners with prizes that will soon show up on Ebay.
Morning meetings with the animators became increasingly bleary-eyed as the festival continued, catalyzed by late screenings and parties. “War stories” of producers and educators continued on panels ranging from animation software to curricula, culminating in an evening with Richard Williams moderated by John Canemaker, in itself worth the journey to Canada (I am so petitioning my school to get the DVD series by Williams, budgets be hanged!). And in a performance redefining old-school techniques, Daniel Barrow related his life in manually-moved overheads, creating a 19th century animated magic lantern show.
Concerns surrounding sliced budgets have made the OIAF subject to the generosity of strangers, but this year remained a celebration. Let’s hope for more projected light from Canada in 2009.
Until then, we’ll always have KAFI in May! (updated note - KAFI is no more - we are but KAFI in Exile now - watch for the T-shirts!)

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Revisiting Sfumata - Number Two

After completing #1 in 1998, #2 should have been a breeze.  After all, it had been begun two years before that, using the unsupported Autodesk Animator Pro, designed for DOS.  Well, after 30 seconds and 90 layers, this much was finished.  Began with adjusting timing and colors, now that technology permits such luxuries on a budget of $35 and paper clips.

Time to wrap up the last 70%.  Let's hope for fewer distractions this time!  After all, #3 is becoming impatient.


Friday, September 20, 2019

"We only have to sell one!" - Chain Pharmacy Pricing Philosophy


And, my, isn't that just ducky....

An international student came into my old pharmacy in January of this year, stricken with anxiety, migraines, and confusion.  She presented this price quote from a nearby chain for three generic medications and wondered if my little clinic pharmacy would have a better price.  Her international insurance told her that this chain was able to fill for her and that she could get 20% of her cost reimbursed.
So I looked at the meds in question, knowing they were all rather inexpensive generics, and ran a quick price comparison with the usual charges from the clinic site.
Topiramate (generic for Topamax) would have cost her $50 with them.  My cost was $15.
Sumatriptan (generic for Imitrex) was originally quoted to her as over $330, but the manager there said they could cut it as a discount for $156.  My usual cost was $45.
Ondansetron (generic for Zofran) was quoted at over $120.  My clinic's cost was $15.
I checked with the prescriber to make the ondansetron a regular tablet vs the ODT version, and cut the price further to $10.  
So the chain wanted over $320 as their best price.  Mine turned out to be $65.

This year seems to be The Big One for crushing independent pharmacies, with slaughtered reimbursement from the major insurance companies and their Pharmacy Benefits Managers (PBMs).  Chains will just throw the burden on the backs of the uninsured.  Independents will become a faded memory.

ASIFA Central Notes of Thursday, September 19, 2019

ASIFA Board Agenda Thursday, September 19, 2019, 8:30pm (11th meeting cancelled due to
monster weather challenges in Grand Rapids, but oh the candlelit stories we can tell…)

Ghosts of Summer Present: Deanna, Julie, Brad, Jim, Chris, Chuck, Bob; Gary, Gretchen, and Steve elsewhere

ASIFA Magazine
Chuck has made plans to meet up with Thomas Renolder to get the magazines at the Ottawa Animation Festival. Chuck will start mailing them out when he gets back in town. The St. Louis members received theirs at the retreat. Deanna has hers, too.

Topics of Capricorn:
OIAF - possible ASIFA meeting on Friday evening, September 27 after screenings? 10:30pm?
- Chuck has his amazing grid of events planned - Jim will tag along and be sure everyone stays hydrated (see other notes below)

Thriller Chiller - Tom and Tony seem to be chatting about final specifics (he doesn’t
need a place to stay, and the large theatre should be room enough for his projectile
needs) $10/person. (no discounts)
Bob will arrange for Postcards from Vistaprint.com (I am sure there are other places on
line, but I have used Vistaprint a bunch. Good quality and good prices. Fairly quick,
too…) Chuck is working on getting pdf info to the group.
Banner is available for the event (Gretchen), fliers and postcards promoting the chapter,
IAD, and membership will also be available at the theater.
Date: 10-12-19, with Tom Sullivan at 6:30 and the screenings of Evil Dead (with or
without commentary) at 7:30/8pm
Costumes for the film? BYOC (bring your own catsup)
Contact Info for chapters
Jim is assembling contact info for other ASIFA Chapters - email, etc - for Board notes,
emails, and sharing newsletters - digital handshakes already being made - if anyone
has contact info to share at that level, drop Jim a line - who is the contact for uploading
newsletter info at ASIFA.net? (we need to ask Corrie Francis Parks to make you the
contact person if you want to be that person, Jim - says Jim, that’s ok with me)
History of the Retreat?

Does anyone know when our retreat started? What is the anniversary date of the
ASIFA/Central Midwest Animator’s retreat?
1992 was the first year.

International Animation Day update
New website for iadasifa.net . Who is interested in doing showings in their areas?
(For 2020 the poster artist will be Regina Pessoa, from Portugal (and NFB). Look for her
film at Ottawa, “Uncle Thomas.”)
Board members checking on additional IAD venues; Brad will provide poster info and
templates for promotion, along with access to submitted films.
ASIFA Hellas is very happy with the Anijam created by ASIFA Central for the event.
Next year’s IAD deadline for submissions to Brad - June 1, 2020

Planning 2020 Events.
Ideas for a December or January event? What about an old fashioned Christmas Animators Party? January event! Christmas Card Boxing Day
Event - movies and projects - stop motion with old holiday cards? Chuck and Jim each
have 100 feet of clear 16mm film and ink pen madness may ensue.

Anything for 60th Anniversary of ASIFA, which is 2020.
1. Festival meetups for ASIFA members at Annecy, OIAF, Hiroshima. The international coordinator is Anastasia Dimitra, from ASIFA Hellas (formerly called Greece).
2. Chuck will float the idea towards Chris Robinson at OIAF.

Other Events:
GLAS coming up in March 2020, Jeanette Bonds of LA
Julie will have an evening at the KIA in March 2020
Project One in GR - Oct 26 - can use to promo IAD on the 28th
GR ComiCon - November 8-10
Current membership 39

Next meeting: Thursday, October 10th at 8:30 p.m. EST
Check on status of Thriller Chiller and other October events.
Assemble outline for next newsletter. -- OIAF, IAD, Thriller Chiller - gather your images and share!

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Because SOMEONE is having one! (now in THREE versions!)

Video to Flash CS5 for initial title overlay, output as an insanely large Quicktime video, then into Vegas for layering, feathering, and speed adjustment - and then an output to mp4.  Easy peasy!

OK, I can't just let well enough alone - another version, tighter cropping, and one second shorter:

Now that the timing is figured out, it can be used with other variations.  Beware, friends with birthdays!

And, oh heck, another version -
...same lousy piano by the animator...

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

JUST IN TIME FOR PHARMACISTS DAY!

About 5 years ago, I sent a note out to the local pharmacy association warning about telepharmacy percolating through the legislature in Michigan - and the likely impact it would have on pharmacist employment. Some goofball from a chain sent it to their legal clods who sent me an email DEMANDING my sources and HOW DARE I spread this sort of information around. Figured I was on to something...this came across from the MPA (Michigan Pharmacists Association) today...I bet some chains plan to "advocate for their special interests." :

Executive Board Discusses SB 340 (Telepharmacy)
Thank you for your input regarding Senate Bill (SB) 340 proposing telepharmacy in Michigan. While the Michigan Pharmacists Association did not initiate this bill, we have been actively engaged to influence this legislation in the best interest of the pharmacy profession and the care of our patients since February. The bill has passed the Senate and has been referred to the House Health Policy Committee chaired by Rep. Vaupel (R-Fowlerville).

The MPA Executive Board met on Monday, Sept. 16 and dedicated a significant portion of their meeting to evaluate and deliberate each and every comment received related to SB 340. Your MPA Executive Board centered their discussion and evaluation of the bill around what’s in the best interest of our patients including ensuring patient safety. The Executive Board is not supporting the bill as passed by the Senate. The bill in now in the House Health Policy Committee. Yesterday at Pharmacy Day at the Capitol (Sept. 17), MPA staff and MPA members met with Rep. Vaupel and discussed the need to have additional changes made to the bill to address the issues of patient safety. While no specific commitments were made, Rep. Vaupel was receptive to the concerns discussed and expressed interest in working with MPA on the issue before the bill is scheduled for a public hearing.

Additional updates will be communicated through MPA publications as we continue to advocate for our profession. We encourage you to continue to monitor this legislation as changes are likely to occur as lobbying groups attempt to advocate for their special interests.

Coffee Playtime - Experiments in Animated GIF to mp4

Version 1 - Rough animatic (animated gif format)

Version 2 - checking timing (mp4 render in Vegas)

Version 3 - with video effects added (again, mp4, again Vegas)



Version 4 - with music edit added (mp4, Vegas)

Version 5 - just an ever-so-slight adjustment with two keyframes - this is why you make exposure sheets, kids, even for short experimental pieces....the difference is barely perceptible.

Animation using Flash CS5, output as a jpg series, imported into Vegas for edit and adjustment.

A "production note" - the background was from a quick acrylic painting of some 8 years past, quickly photographed and placed into the Flash library, before being converted to a symbol and then given an alpha adjustment. The original imported image was fairly large, even after conversion once introduced to the Flash environment.  As a result, animating even this brief piece became a challenge due to memory restrictions - things slowed down and the system crashed frequently (the laptop being used having only 8megs of RAM).  I ended up deleting the background file until everything was completed, then put it in place for the two sequences where it appears (after the explosion, I darkened it slightly and knocked it askew).
Everything was still exported as a series of about 225 jpgs, then imported as individual frames to the Sony Vegas software (now called MAGIX - Version 15 is used here, since version 16 is a real estate hog on the hard drive).